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    Edward Foulke ID0168
Eleanor Hugh ID0169

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Parents - Edward Foulke Thomas and Lowery Edwards
Parents - Eleanor Hugh Cadwallader and Gwen Williams
  For the Most up-to-date information Visit: 
MRM Family Page
 

Timeline

13 Jul 1651 Edward Born - Coed Y Foel Isaf, Merionethshire County, Wales - [S5 page 120][S6 page 702] - [S7] -  [S8 page 233] - [S9 pages 89, 458] - [S10]
1653 Eleanor Born - Denbighshire, Wales - S10 -
Abt 1682 Edward and Eleanor Married - Merionethshire County, Wales -[S5 page 120] - [S6 page 702] - [S7] - [S8 page 233] - [S11 page 1]
Bef 1698 Residence - Edward, Eleanor and Family - Coed Y Foel Isaf, Merionethshire County, Wales -[S5 page 120 ] -
3 Apr 1698 Emigration - Edward, Eleanor and 9 Children - Coed Y Foel Isaf, Merionethshire County, Wales - Emigration/Immigration Page
17 July 1698 Immigration - Edward, Eleanor and 9 Children - Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania -  Emigration/Immigration Page
Aft 17 Jul 1698 Residence - Edward, Eleanor and Family - on 700 acres of land sixteen miles from Philadelphia -
[S6 page 703]:   "Upon arriving in Pennsylvania, Edward Foulke bought seven hundred acres of land sixteen miles from Philadelphia."

[S9 page 89]:  "I soon purchased a fine tract of land of about seven hundred acres, sixteen miles form Philadelphia, on a part of which I settled, and divers others of our company, who came over sea with us, settled near me at the same time. This was the beginning of November, 1698, aforesaid, and the township was called Gwynedd or North Wales."

Plat showing location of the first settlers tracts of land - Gwynedd Township - Edward Foulke, 712 acres - S8 page f58 and 62,
28 Nov 1700 Edward named as guardian and overseer in a will - [S15 page 276]:  "The long will, all in Welsh, of Cadwalader David ap Hugh, of Gwynedd, dated 23 Nov 1700, gives to Hugh ap Edward ₤18 , and appoints brother Evan ap Hugh, and Edward Foulke to be guardians, and overseers."
16 Jan 1733 Eleanor Dies - Gwynedd, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania - [S8 page 233] - [S10] -

BuriedGwynedd Friends Cemetery - [S16]:  "Grave Location: O 49 - Birth: 13 July 1651 - Died: About 1741, could be as early as 10 Mo 1739 - Notes: - From whom all the Foulkes are descended - His wife, Ellin is also buried here (1733) but there is no stone (Gwynedd records)"  Find a Grave Page
1741 Edward Dies - Gwynedd, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania - [S10] - [S11 page 1] -
[S8 page 233]:  "(There is also a statement that he was 88 yrs. 5 mos. old at his death, which, the date of his birth being fixed according to his own narrative, in 1651, would place his death in 1739.)"

BuriedGwynedd Friends Cemetery[S16]:  "Grave Location: O 49 - Birth: 13 July 1651 - Died: About 1741, could be as early as 10 Mo 1739 - Notes: - From whom all the Foulkes are descended - His wife, Ellin is also buried here (1733) but there is no stone (Gwynedd records)"   Find a Grave Page -
   
   
  Edward's Exhortation to his Children -
  Edward Biography - [S3] -
  Edward Foulke Ancestry -
   

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Children
Hugh Foulke ID0166  (Separate Page) (My Ancestor) -  - MRM Page -
Thomas Foulke ID2286 - MRM Page -
Emigration/Immigration Page   -
Note:  Information concerning one of Thomas' descendants, Joseph Foulke, ID2563 and his son Dr. Joseph Foulke, Jr., ID4765 is located here
   (Thomas > Edward > Hugh > Joseph > Joseph, Jr.)
Jane Foulke   ID2288 - MRM Page -
Emigration/Immigration Page   -
Margaret Foulke   ID2291 - MRM Page -
Emigration/Immigration Page   -
Cadwallader Foulke ID2292 - MRM Page -
Emigration/Immigration Page   -   
Evan Foulke   ID2290 - MRM Page -
Emigration/Immigration Page   -
Gwen Foulke   ID2293 - MRM Page -
Emigration/Immigration Page   -
Grace Foulke   ID2287 - MRM Page -
Emigration/Immigration Page   -
Catharine Foulke   ID2289 - MRM Page -
Emigration/Immigration Page   -

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Edward's Exhortation to his Children
My dear children: There has been for a considerable time, something on my mind to say to you by way of advice, before I return to dust, and resign my soul to Him who gave it: though I find some difficulty in delivering my thoughts in writing.

My first admonition to you, is, that you fear the Lord, and depart from evil all the days of your life.

Secondly, as you are brothers and sisters, I beseech you to love one another, and your neighbors too. If any of your neighbors injure you, in word or deed, bear it with patience and humility. It is more pleasing in the sight of God and good men, to forgive injuries, than it is to revenge them. Rather pray for them, than wish them any evil: Lest that text in scripture, which requires an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth, come into your minds when you leave this world, and you be found wanting. For without doubt, he that is thoughtless and negligent all his days about the welfare of his soul, will some day or another, in the midst of his extremity, call on the rocks and mountains to secure him from the vengeance of an offended God.

My dear children, accustom not yourselves to loose, vain talking, which the scriptures declare against. It was hurtful to me in my youth, and stopped my virtue. The temptations of this world are very powerful, as Job said by experience. Be watchful over your evening conversation. Let pious thoughts possess your souls for the moment before you close your eyes for sleep. If you do that, you will be more likely to find yourselves in the morning in a meek, humble posture before God, who preserved you from evil. This will produce peace and calmness of mind, with a blessing in your outward affairs: as we read of Isaac, whose pious meditations in the field, was rewarded with outward and inward blessings.

I desire you not to reject the least appearance of good which may arise in your minds as if it could be obtained at pleasure. Give speedy obedience unto God who begets this diving emotion in your hearts. For a man's abode in this world is very doubtful. It often happens that death comes without warning: yet we must go whether ready or not -- where the tree falls, there it must be. I knew a man in the land of my nativity, that went to bed with his wife at night and died before morning, unknown to her. Such things are designed, I believe, as a warning to us, that we may arm ourselves against the terrors of such a day.

And of such as die after that manner, we have little to say, save that they died and were buried; placing the rest amongst the mysteries of the Almighty. Hence let us take a view of our own weakness, and judge of one another with charity.

I feel sorrow now in my old age, for want of being more careful and circumspect in my youth. Although I did nothing that brought shame on myself, or grief on my parents; yet there was amongst the loose, inconsistent youth, too many things which they called innocent, without considering they were building on the sand; and I was often drawn into vain mirth with them. There is a vast difference between the two sentences, delivered to those who built on the rock, and those who built on the sand. Our Saviour said of the latter, their fall shall be great.

Let me entreat you, my dear children, assume not the appearance of religion, without a real possession of it in your hearts. Our Saviour compared such as did so, to sepulchres, white without, but within, full of dead men's bones. Yet I have better hopes of you, though I mention this.

I have known, at times, something pressing me to read good books, or to go aside in private, to pray: which, if I neglected, and took my liberty other ways, then indifference and hardness would prevail, which deprived me of those good inclinations for a considerable time after. I have also to tell you of my own experience, concerning attending week-day meetings. Whenever I suffered trifling occasions, or my outward affairs, and business, if not urgent, to interrupt my going, a cool reflection and serious view, made me look upon it as a loss or injury done to my better part; and generally, the business done that day, did not answer my expectations of it in the morning.

One thing more comes into my mind, by searching myself; which is, that it had been better for me, if I had been more careful, in sitting with my family at meals, with a sober countenance; because children and servants have eyes and observations on those who have the command and government of them. It has a great influence on the life and manners of youth.

So my dear children, perhaps some of you may get some advantage by this. If you consider with attention this innocent simplicity of life and manners I have been speaking of, you need not fear but that God will preserve you in safety from the snares of the devil, and the storms of this inconstant world. By diligence also you shall obtain victory over the deceitfulness of riches. I fear there are too many of this age, who suffer themselves to be carried away with the torrent of corruption. And not only such as content themselves, as it were, in the outward porch; but also such as make greater pretences than those: even they who ere looked upon as pillars in the church, have, I fear, turned their backs upon it. I lay these things close to you, that you may be careful and diligent, whilst you have time left, lest by degrees, indifference creep upon you, under the disguise of an easy mind, and you forget, it is he who holds out to the end shall be saved.

And as for your father and mother, our time is almost come to a period. We have lived together above fifty years, and now in our old age, the Lord is as good and gracious as ever He was. He gives us a comfortable living. Now in the close of our days, we have fresh occasion to acknowledge His benevolence and abounding goodness to us.

Now I think I can with peace of mind conclude, with hopes that your prayers will be for us in the most needful time, especially on a dying pillow, when our time in this world comes to an eternal rest. I conclude in the words of the prophet Jeremiah, "See thee up way marks, make thee high leaps, set thy heart toward the highway, even the way that thou wentest. Turn again, Oh Virgin of Israel, turn again to these thy cities." [S4]

 

 

Sources
 

Source Citation

Image
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S1 Google Earth -  
S2 Posting to the RootsWeb mailing list Frongoch-Wales-L, 14 Oct 2002.  Acc001146. - See Note 3
http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/FRONGOCH-WALES/2002-10/1034619716  (URL OK 19 Aug 2014)
 
S3 File on USGenWeb web site - "THE HISTORY OF BUCKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA, CHAPTER XXVIII, RICHLAND, 1734" - Doc0300.odt http://files.usgwarchives.net/pa/bucks/history/local/davis/davis28.txt

Edward Foulke, the first of the name in Pennsylvania, and among the
earliest settlers in Richland, was born in North Wales, Great Britain, July
13, 1651. He was the son of Thomas Foulke, who descended through twelve
generation from Lord Penllyn, married Eleanor, daughter of Hugh Cadwallader,
and had nine children, Thomas, Hugh, Cadwallader, Evan, Gwently, Grace, Jane,
Catharine and Margaret. He came to America with his family in 1698, landing at
Philadelphia July 17th. He bought 700 acres in Gwynedd township, Montgomery
county, where he settled the following November, with a number of other
immigrants who came about the same time. [His second son, Hugh, born 1685, on
his marriage in 1713] removed to Richland and settled in the neighborhood of
Quakertown. Numerous descendants of Edward Foulke are living in this and
adjoining counties and states, among which is [the late Benjamin G.*] Foulke,
of Quakertown. The family has always been one of consideration and influence,
and several of its members have occupied responsible positions of public
trust. Thomas Foulke, son of the first Edward, died in 1786, at the age of
63, and his daughter Jane [the widow of Thomas, died June*] 1822, at the age
of 93. The Foulkes are members of the society of Friends. [See Foulke Family,
vol. iii*]

 

 
S4 Web Page, "Edward Foulke's Exhortation to his Children" - http://www.foulke.org/history/docs/exhort.html  
S5 Book - Roberts, Clarence F and Warren S Ely. Early Friends Families of Upper Bucks with some account of their Descendants. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Clarence V Roberts, 1925.  Bk2905  
S6 Book - Haines, John F. History of Hamilton County, Indiana...... Indianapolis, Indiana: B. F. Bowen, 1915  Bk2922  
S7 Family History Sheet - "The Ancestry of Edward Foulke, of Gwynedd, Pennsylvania" by Charles M Ffoulke. http://www.foulke.org/history/docs/1898.html#ancestry  - Acc000972 Doc0297.pdf
S8 Book - Jenkins, Howard M. Historical Collections Relating to Gwynedd. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Howard M Jenkins, 1897 - Bk2910 Archive.org - Read Online
S9 Book - Davis W W H, Warren S Ely and John W Jordan. History of Bucks County, Pennsylvania, Vol 3: From the discovery of the Delaware to the Present Time. Second. New York: Lewis Publishing Co, 1905. Digital images.  Bk3104 - Repository:  Google Books  
S10 Family History Sheet - Family History Sheet, Edward Foulke. http://www.foulke.org/genealogy/sheets/sheet001.shtml - Acc000925  
S11 Family History Sheet - Foulke Family Sheets. Created by Myron Foulke Robbins, Sr ID0016. Acc001131/Doc0764.pdf Doc0764.pdf
S12 Web Page - "Edward's Account of His Voyage" - http://www.foulke.org/history/docs/voyage.html
"... We lived at a place called Coed-y-foel, a beautiful farm belonging to Roger Price, Esq. of Rhiwalas, at Merionethshire, aforesaid. But in process of time, I had an inclination to remove my family to the Province of Pennsylvania; and in order there, to we set out on the 3d day of the 2d month, A.D. 1698, and came in two days time to Liverpool where, with divers others who intended to go on the voyage, we took shipping the 17th of the same month on board the Robert and Elizabeth, and the next day set sail for Ireland, where we arrived and stayed until the first of the third month, May, and then sailed again for Pennsylvania, and were about eleven weeks at sea. And the sore distemper of the bloody flux broke out in the vessel, of which died in our passage, five and fourty persons. The distemper was so mortal that two or three corpses were cast overboard each day while it lasted.  But through the favor of Mercy and of Divine Providence, I with my wife and nine children escaped that sore mortality, and arrived safe in Philadelphia, the 17th of the 5th month, July, where were kindly received and hospitably entertained by our friends and old acquaintances."
 
S13 Database Online - "Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s". Edward Foulke. 1698. www.ancestry.com , accessed 2 Nov 2007. Acc000970

1. Name: Edward Foulke - Year: 1698 - Place: Pennsylvania - Source Publication Code: 2606.13 - Source: Welsh Founders of Pennsylvania, vol 2, page 39 [Bk2909 - S14, ]
2. Name: Edward Foulke - Year: 1698 - Place: Pennsylvania - Family Members: With family - Source Publication Code: 2606.12 - Source: Welsh Founders of Pennsylvania, vol 1, pages 142, 168 - [Bk2909 - S14, ]
3. Name: Edward Foulke - Year: 1698 - Place: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania - Family Members: 9 Children - Source Publication Code: 9448 - Source: Immigrant Ancestors, page 31,[ Bk3448 - S11, ]
4. Name Edward Foulke - Year: 1698 - Place: Pennsylvania - Source Publication Code: 983 - Source: Welsh Settlement of Pennsylvania, page 300, 596 - [Bk2912 - S18, ]

 
S14 Book - Glenn, Thomas Allen. Welsh Founders of Pennsylvania.: Fox, Jones & Co, 1911-1913 - Bk2909  
S15 Book - Browning, Charles H. Welsh Settlement of Pensylvania. Philadelphia: William J Campbell, 1912 - Bk2912 - Repository:  Google Books  
S16 Web Pages:

Gwynedd Friends Burial Ground, Older Burials -
http://www.gwyneddmeeting.org/history/gwyneddburialindex.htm

Gwynedd Friends Meeting Burial Records 1715-1749, including the fatal epidemic of 1745 -
http://www.gwyneddmeeting.org/history/burial_records.htm

 
S17 Article, Foulke Family Herald, April 1991 "A Brief History of the Homestead at Penllyn" by Larry Foulke. Acc001166 Ph8405.jpg
S18 Book:  Virkus, Frederick Adams. Immigrant ancestors: a list of 2,500 immigrants to America before 1750. Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Pub Co, 1963, reprint 1986 - Bk3448  
S19    
S20    
S21    
S22    
S23    
S24    
S25    

 

Notes
N1 "But in process of time i had an inclination to remove thence with my family to the Province of Pennsylvania, and in order thereto we set out on the 3rd day of the Second Month (April) 1698, and came in two days to Liverpool, where with divers others who intended to go the voyage, we took shipping the 17th of the same month on Board the Robert and Elizabeth and the next day set sail for Ireland, where we arrived and stayed until the first of third month (May) and then sailed again for Pennsylvania. We were about eleven weeks at sea and the sore distemper of the Bloody Flux broke out in the vessel, of which died forty-five persons in our passage. The distemper was so mortal that two or three Corps were cast overboard every day while it continued. But through the favor of Divine Providence, I, with my wife and nine children escaped that sore mortality and arrived safe at Philadelphia about the 17th of 5th Month (July) where we were kindly received and entertained by our friends and old acquaintances until I purchased a tract of about 700 acres of Land about 16 miles from Philadelphia, on a part of which I settled, and divers others of our company who came over sea together settled near me about the same time, which was the beginning of November, 1698, aforesaid, and the township was named Gwynedd or North Wales.

This account was written the 14th of the 11th Month (January) 1702, in British (or Welsh) by Edward Foulke [ID0168] and translated (in 1810) by Samuel Foulke." ID0147

Note: About an 11 week journey - many people suffered from distemper of bloody flux - 45 died, but none of the Foulke family

 
N2
Edward Foulke, the first of the name in Pennsylvania, and among the
earliest settlers in Richland, was born in North Wales, Great Britain, July
13, 1651. He was the son of Thomas Foulke, who descended through twelve
generation from Lord Penllyn, married Eleanor, daughter of Hugh Cadwallader,
and had nine children, Thomas, Hugh, Cadwallader, Evan, Gwently, Grace, Jane,
Catharine and Margaret. He came to America with his family in 1698, landing at
Philadelphia July 17th. He bought 700 acres in Gwynedd township, Montgomery
county, where he settled the following November, with a number of other
immigrants who came about the same time. [His second son, Hugh, born 1685, on
his marriage in 1713] removed to Richland and settled in the neighborhood of
Quakertown. Numerous descendants of Edward Foulke are living in this and
adjoining counties and states, among which is [the late Benjamin G.*] Foulke,
of Quakertown. The family has always been one of consideration and influence,
and several of its members have occupied responsible positions of public
trust. Thomas Foulke, son of the first Edward, died in 1786, at the age of
63, and his daughter Jane [the widow of Thomas, died June*] 1822, at the age
of 93. The Foulkes are members of the society of Friends. [See Foulke Family,
vol. iii*]
 
N3

"ROBERT AND ELIZABETH" PASSENGER LIST 1698 [Foulke Family]

Thomas ab Evan, son of Evan ab Evan and his first cousin, William ap John,
left Bala, Merioneth, Wales, in late 1697, preceding the larger group of
emigrants to Philadelphia in order to buy a tract of land from William Penn
for a new (second) Welsh settlement in Pennsylvania. The rest of the Welsh
Company immigrants sailed from Liverpool on 18 April 1698 on the ship Robert
& Elizabeth, Robert Haydock of Liverpool, owner, Ralph Williams, master. It
stopped at Dublin, Ireland, departing there 1 May 1698, reaching
Philadelphia eleven weeks later on 17 (Smith's History of Pennsylvania say
the 7th) July 1698. . . During the voyage, 45 of the passengers, and 3 of the
crew, died of a form of dysentery (the bloody flux). The Robert and
Elizabeth was to have transported 145 people. Howard M. Jenkins in
Historical Collections Relating to Gwynedd believes that some of the total
compliment of passengers may have been servants, hence not noted anywhere.

[10/14/2002: It appears that the passenger list for the voyage no longer
exists, and following is a beginning attempt to recreate it. Please let me
know corrections or additions:

Included in the list of passengers:
Edward ap Foulke (from Coed-y-foel)
Eleanor v Hugh (wife of Edward ap Foulke)
Their children:
Grace Foulke
Thomas Foulke
Gwen Foulke
Hugh Foulke
Jane Foulke
Catherine Foulke
Margaret Foulke
Evan Foulke
Cadwallader Foulke  [2]

 
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N15  

 

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